Hardware shutdown switch for RPi

Sometimes I need to power off one of my Raspberry Pis, and since I run these computers headless, going to a remote SSH terminal to issue a shutdown command can be extra work. I saw a webpage mentioning using a simple 2 pin jumper to initiate a shutdown script for the Pi. So that’s what I did (green tab on the GPIO pins), I chose python due to the wait_for_edge function.

This script will shutdown the RPi when the tab is pulled. Strangely the RPi will boot if you plug the jumper back in after it has shutdown, or if you pull it out after it has completed shut down (putting it back before it has completed shutting down). If there is no jumper in during boot, then the script will close.

#!/usr/bin/env python
#note crontab for superuser required a new PATH variable as here http://unix.stackexchange.com/questions/43392#answer-43394
import subprocess
try:
 import RPi.GPIO as GPIO
except RuntimeError:
 print("Error importing RPi.GPIO! This is probably because you need superuser privileges. You can achieve this by using 'sudo' to run your script")

#http://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/questions/12966/what-is-the-difference-between-board-and-bcm-for-gpio-pin-numbering
GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BOARD)
GPIO.setup(5, GPIO.IN) #Hardware Pullup on this pin..

ShutdownCommand = ['shutdown', '-h', 'now', '"System halted by GPIO action"']

if GPIO.input(5) == 0:
 #run script waiting for jumper removal
 GPIO.wait_for_edge(5, GPIO.RISING)
 GPIO.remove_event_detect(5)
 KillProcess = subprocess.Popen(ShutdownCommand, stdout=subprocess.PIPE, stderr=subprocess.STDOUT)
 MountData, MountError = KillProcess.communicate()
 GPIO.cleanup() 
else:
 GPIO.cleanup()

Then I simply added this script to the bottom of my root crontab (sudo crontab -e) to run at reboot:

@reboot python /usr/local/sbin/ShutdownJumper.py

Monitoring RPi Temp and CPU with Thingspeak

I made the following python script to update CPU Temperature and 5 minute average CPU load of my RPi to Thingspeak:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import subprocess
import httplib, urllib

GetTempCommand = "cat /sys/class/thermal/thermal_zone0/temp"
GetCPUCommand = "cat /proc/loadavg"

GetTempProcess = subprocess.Popen(GetTempCommand.split(), stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
GetTempOutput = GetTempProcess.communicate()[0]
Temp = float(GetTempOutput) / 1000
#print Temp
GetCPUProcess = subprocess.Popen(GetCPUCommand.split(), stdout=subprocess.PIPE)
GetCPUOutput = GetCPUProcess.communicate()[0]
CPU = GetCPUOutput.split()
#print CPU[1]

params = urllib.urlencode({'field1': CPU[1],'field2': Temp, 'key':'######'})     # use your API key generated in the thingspeak channels for the value of 'key'
# temp is the data you will be sending to the thingspeak channel for plotting the graph. You can add more than one channel and plot more graphs
headers = {"Content-typZZe": "application/x-www-form-urlencoded","Accept": "text/plain"}
conn = httplib.HTTPConnection("api.thingspeak.com:80")                
try:
    conn.request("POST", "/update", params, headers)
    response = conn.getresponse()
    data = response.read()
    conn.close()
except:
    print "connection failed"

The script is run every 5 mins using cron ($ crontab -e):

*/5 * * * * python "/home/ubuntu/logging/TempCPUtoThingspeak.py"

I borrowed some script from here and here.

Running DC++ on my RPI3

MicroDC2 Seems to be a good client to use for a headless server. It is configured by command line and there appears to be an update released just recently (first update in 5 years). The package installs using apt-get in Debian (I’m using Debian since there isn’t a proper Ubuntu release for the RPI3 yet).

sudo apt-get install microdc2

Continue reading “Running DC++ on my RPI3”